Young people we’ve spoken to, especially once they start High School, say they find it hard to talk to their parents about when things go wrong online.

When things go wrong is not always the best time to discuss expectations, boundaries and penalties for misuse. Taking time to have these discussions as prevention rather than cure can take the heated emotion from situations and allow more rational and practical discussions to take place.

Starting before your child has a mobile phone, Social networking accounts or an attachment to technology that feels like an extra limb can help to set expectations that are open, clear and understood.

There is no ONE way to do this, parents have different strategies, styles and relationships with their children but we have tried to offer some ideas and information for you.  There is also a link to get in touch with us to Share your stories, feedback, comments or ideas.

Parental Involvement to combat Cyber Bullying has even hit the Headlines with the Dominion Post reporting:

Parents are being warned to keep up with changing technology, as new ways emerge for children to be bullied.

The latest online technologies are making it easier for bullies to attack the vulnerable, experts say.

Click HERE to read the Full Article

Netsafe’s Advice for Parents about preventing Cyberbullying:

  • Talk with your children about cyberbullying and see how they understand the issue
  • Reassure your child that you will not remove their technology as a knee-jerk reaction to problems (including cyberbullying).  Young people tell Netsafe that fear of losing access to their comouter or mobile phone is one of the reasons why they don’t report cyberbullying
  • Advise younger children to be careful who they give their mobile phone number to and to not pass on friends’ numbers without asking them first
  • Remind them not to respond to texts from people they don’t know
  • Talk with your child about what images, if posted online or sent fon a mobile phone, could get sent to others and be used to bully or embarass them.

Source:  www.cyberbullying.org.nz/parents